Commit CV suicide! How not to write CV as  a Graphic designer

So you are graphic designer or you finally started to call yourself one?

You’ve built up your portfolio with some fancy business card from local plumber and hairdressing salons?
Congrats!

That doesn’t make you a graphic designer, but it is definitely a start and if you want to do your job seriously, maybe you should consider writing a cover letter/cv and send it to graphic design job proposals.

Here is a list of things not to do!

1. Start your mail with “dear”

As you are so kind and beautiful soul inside with all your feelings and compassion for starving Africa kids, please don’t start with this. Yes, first impression is important, but you are not talking to your grandson but to your future employer.

2. over confidence

Confidence is  good, and often the main reason which will get you a job, but overconfident mail saying that your works will say for you and whole coocky mood will leave the bad overall impression. Instead, try to be the person who is giving it’s best shot to get a job among all other competitors. That is the best you can do. Charm always helps, but don’t forget to keep it formal in a matter of business talk. You can keep the confidence and prince charming part for the live interview, in case you are shortlisted.

3. Your career as waiter

Yes, you’ve also worked as a waiter or warehouse assistant and it was damn hard and you’ve learned a lot about work or life, but applying for graphic design job should be focused on one thing – you as a graphic designer. Knowing office package is definitely a plus, but do you want to work on excel tables to build up your portfolio? Will your driving license impress your future employer who is expecting you to do fancy graphics and nothing more? Stay focused on subject.

4. Non-professional portfolio

Printed map of works is outdated, and being there are many services online providing portfolio presentations, you should use one.

Try to make the best out of what you have, even if you did some stuff that you are ashamed off. Of course, try to filter your portfolio items by relevancy and range, and try to ditch some not so good items to raise the overall quality of perception of your works.

5. Don’t include recommendations

Everything may look awesome and polished, but recommendations are powerful tool for you. With few good recommendations, employer gets the idea of your business aspect, communicating with clients and your overall service as a young entrepreneur, just as what are they looking for.

6. Pretend to be “the guy”

You can pretend to be someone else, but for how long?

You should be yourself and that is probably the best tip you can get.

Why? Well, being yourself and not getting a job because of that will point you in the direction where you should direct yourself as a future professional. Your works may be the greatest, but if communication is out of order than you know what you should improve and make it part of your identity. It is a good habit to observe your minuses and try to fix them in small but sure increments, you’ll see the difference in your mood, confidence and overall performance.

Also, don’t overdress. You are graphic designer and you are not wearing suits. dress something polite but also comfortable. try to be yourself once again. but be clean off course!
7. Listen to the bloggers advices

That is kind of bitter-sweet thing to do. it is in good manner to get some research and to prepare yourself, but all the job interviews and proposals are different in some way, so you can’t really rely on the generalized advices from the random self called gurus. try it yourself. Look on the job seeking as a journey of learning, not frustrating process of being rejected every damn time.

To finalize, I will quote Rocky Balboa. “it ain’t about how hard you hit. It is about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. That’s how winning is done.”